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In colloquial French, the present tense is commonly used to indicate an event that will take place in the future. It is important to note that this construction is used by all social levels. For example:

On en parle plus tard.

We'll talk about it later.

Je r'viens dans une heure.

I'll be back in an hour.

J'le fais d'main.

I'll do it tomorrow.

 

This also holds true when using "if' and "then" clauses. Ordinarily, when the "if' clause is in the present tense, the "then" clause is in the future tense:

 

Si tu m'rends c'service, J'te donn'rai mon nouveau disque.

If you do me this favor, I will give you my new record.

Si tu viens chez moi, j'te f rai un bon diner.

If you come to my house, I will make you a good dinner.

S'i' m'pose encore des questions, j'répondrai pas.

If he asks me more questions, I will not answer.

 

However, using the colloquial construction, the "then" clause remains in the present tense even though a reference to an event taking place in the future is being made :

 

Si tu m'rends c'service, j'te donne mon nouveau disque.

If you do me this favor, I will give you my new record.

Si tu viens chez moi, j'te fais un bon dîner.

If you come to my house, I will make you a good dinner.

S'i' m'pose encore des questions, j'réponds pas.

If he asks me more questions, I will not answer.



Dernière mise à jour | 2017-02-28